Greenway Favorites

Burke Museum

Priority Areas:
Urban and Edge Communities
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UW Campus, 17th Ave NE and NE 45th St, Seattle
The Burke features the natural and cultural history of the Pacific Northwest – birds, fossils, logging tools – you name it, and one of the Burke’s education programs or exhibits can tell you about it. Located in the University District, the museum always has something new to teach, in an afternoon or a week-long summer

Coal Mines Trail

Priority Areas:
Upper Yakima Basin
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Kittitas County
This former Burlington Northern Santa Fe railway is now a trail connecting the historic towns of Cle Elum, Roslyn, and Ronald through Central Washington forests and past small mountains of tailings left from coal mining days. The Greenway Trust helped local communities buy the six-mile trail corridor.

Cooper River Trail

Priority Areas:
Upper Yakima Basin
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Wenatchee National Forest
A magnificent walk along 4 miles of the rushing Cooper River leads to Cooper Lake, a reservoir surrounded by eastern Cascade peaks and forested slopes. Anglers and families alike will enjoy trout, birds, and wildlife.

Hiram M. Chittenden Locks

Priority Areas:
Urban and Edge Communities
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33rd Avenue Northwest / Northwest 54th Street, Seattle
Many lake and river systems of King County flow to the sea through the locks in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. Fish ladder viewing platforms allow visitors to catch glimpses of migrating salmon, a powerful reminder of the thread of life that begins in snowmelt from the mountains along the Greenway.

Issaquah-Preston-Snoqualmie Trail

Priority Areas:
Urban and Edge Communities
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Issaquah-Preston-Snoqualmie Trail
This 11 mile trail traces a historic railrorad route with gentle grades ideal for walking, running and bicycling. The demolition of a historical railroad trestle in Preston provides one exception where the route detours into the Raging River Valley before climbing again to the north side of Snoqualmie Ridge.

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

Priority Areas:
Urban and Edge Communities
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319 Second Ave S., Seattle
Gold! read the headlines in July of 1897. After years of struggling through a depression, the people of the nation were intrigued by the possibility of riches. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park preserves the story of the 1897-98 stampede to the Yukon gold fields and Seattle’s role in this event. The park offers a

Lake Sammamish State Park

Priority Areas:
Urban and Edge Communities
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2000 NW Sammamish State Park,
A favorite day-use destination for boaters, water skiers, swimmers, and picnickers. Lake Sammamish State Park is a 512-acre day-use park with 6,858 feet of waterfront. The area around the lake was an important culture zone for local Native American tribes for centuries. The park provides deciduous forest and wetland vegetation for the enjoyment of visitors.

Mailbox Peak Trail

Priority Areas:
Middle Fork Snoqualmie Valley
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Middle Fork Snoqualmie NRCA
This beautiful trail in the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River valley offers amazing view, after a rigorous climb. Over the last decade, the Greenway spearheaded a region-wide effort to build a safer, more sustainable route to this popular peak, with the new trail opening in 2014.

Meadowbrook Farm

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
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1711 Boalch Avenue, North Bend, Snoqualmie
This scenic open space on the Snoqualmie Valley Floor is an important story location to the Snoqualmie Tribal people. Historically, the Snoqualmie Tribal people maintained the prairie through traditional methods. Today, Meadowbrook Farm is managed for historic and cultural interpretation, wildlife habitat, agriculture, and public recreation by multiple municipalities. The 460-acre farm at the foot

Mercer Slough Nature Park

Priority Areas:
Urban and Edge Communities
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1625 118th Ave. SE, Bellevue
Tucked into the southern end of Bellevue, this park includes 320 acres of wetlands and meadows with five miles of trails for nature walks, canoe trips, and bird watching. A partnership between the Pacific Science Center and City of Bellevue Parks Department, the Mercer Slough Environmental Education Center provides year-round education and hands-on learning in

Mount Si Trail

Priority Areas:
Middle Fork Snoqualmie Valley, Snoqualmie River Valley
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Mt Si Natural Resources Conservation Area
Mount Si is a favorite hiking and rock climbing destination with a strenuous 4-mile (each way) trail to the summit to sweeping views of the surrounding natural areas, cities, working farms, and forests in this picturesque part of the Greenway.  This mountain may look like an impenetrable fortress of solid rock, but it is actually

Pacific Crest Trail

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
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Gifford Pinchot National Forest
The Pacific Crest Trail spans 2,650 miles from Mexico to Canada through California, Oregon, and Washington. In Washington State, it passes through several national parks, forests and wilderness areas. There are 444 miles of the trail in Washington State.

Palouse to Cascades State Park Trail

Priority Areas:
Upper Yakima Basin
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Palouse to Cascades State Park Trail
A major, non-motorized, cross-state link, this former Milwaukee Road railway grade reaches from Rattlesnake Lake near North Bend east across Washington State. The level grade of this gravel trail makes it ideal for mountain bikers, equestrians, and walkers. Main trailheads are at Rattlesnake Lake and Hyak (ADA-accessible). Hyak is the closest access to the damp,

Rattlesnake Ledge Trail

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
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Cedar River Watershed
This popular 4-mile round trip, with 1100 feet of elevation gain, leads to a ledge with views of the Cedar River watershed including the Rattlesnake and Chester Morse Lakes. Or continue all 11 miles to hike to Snoqualmie Point Parks on the northwestern edge of the mountain. Rattlesnake Ledge Trail is an important story location to

Snoqualmie Falls

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
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6501 Railroad Avenue SE, 98065, Snoqualmie
Snowmelt from the Cascade Mountains feeds the Snoqualmie River as it cuts through the valley to plunge over 270-foot Snoqualmie Falls, creating a spectacular natural attraction that draws 1.5 million visitors a year. A trail leads to viewing platforms and down switchbacks to the foot of the falls. From time immemorial, the Snoqualmie Tribe has

Snoqualmie Point Park

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
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37580 SE Winery Road, Snoqualmie
Snoqualmie Point Park offers sweeping views of the Cascades and Snoqualmie Pass. Adjacent to the park is the western trailhead to Rattlesnake Mountain. In the late 1990s there was a plan to develop eight office buildings on the site which had once been a winery and later was zoned for industrial development. A partnership of

Snoqualmie Valley Trail

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
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Snoqualmie Valley Trail
The Snoqualmie Valley Trail is King County’s longest and perhaps most majestic regional trail. This soft-surface greenway parallels the Snoqualmie River for more than 31 miles from Duvall southeast to Rattlesnake Lake and Seattle’s Cedar River Watershed above North Bend. The SVT follows a historic railroad route through the lower and upper Snoqualmie River valleys

Tiger Mountain State Forest

Categories:
King County
The state’s most popular hiking, biking, and equestrian trails wind through 13,000 acres in this working forest and conservation area.   The Washington State Department of Natural Resources manages the forest for recreation and habitat for native plants and animals, and to provide funds for public services.

Tolt MacDonald Park

Priority Areas:
Snoqualmie River Valley
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NE 40th at Highway 203, 98014,
Located along the East bank of the Snoqualmie River, Tolt-MacDonald is a King County Park within easy walk of the town of Carnation. Just 40 minutes from downtown Seattle, the park has tables and firepits, overnight campsites and day use sites, as well as soccer fields and a historic barn used for events. A 500-foot